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Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) - Definition, Symptoms & Causes

Thoughts, feelings and behaviour form personality. A person with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) thinks, feels and behaves in ways which cause crises for themself and others. Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) involves instability, of emotions, personal identity, and in relationships. Young adults, more than older adults, have Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). An underlying disorder may manifest as Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) in women and Antisocial Personality Disorder (APD) in men.
 

Symptoms of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD)

The symptoms of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) may include unpredictable emotions, an unstable self image, impulsivity, intense and unstable relationships, acts or threats of self harm, and suicidal thoughts and behaviour. A person with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) may fear imagined or real abandonment and have repeated crises. As with all Personality Disorders, BPD is considered either a definable and treatable mental health problem, or a label for socially unacceptable behaviour.

Causes of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD)

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) may be related to adolescence, alcoholic parents, or anxiety disorders such as panic disorder or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) or social phobia. BPD may also be related to bipolar disorder, childhood abuse, eating disorders, neglect, parental abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse, or violent parents. Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) may be linked to issues such as alcohol abuse, depression, drug abuse, family problems, or parents with mental health problems.
 

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Updated 08 July 2011